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Piper Aztec, private aircraft charter


The PIPER AZTEC PRIVATE AIRCRAFT Charter! This aircraft can get into the smallest airports with the shortest runways, please CONTACT US!

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The PIPER AZTEC PRIVATE AIRCRAFT, Charter Aircraft! Aircraft Charter Flights, when and where you need them.

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The PIPER AZTEC PRIVATE AIRCRAFT, Charter Aircraft! These aircraft are one of the smallest they make.

Piper Aztec


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The PIPER AZTEC PRIVATE AIRCRAFT, Charter Aircraft! Please CONTACT US at anytime.



"The PIPER AZTEC Airplane"

  1. Crew: one.
  2. Capacity: 4-6 passengers.
  3. Range 1100 nm.
  4. Cabin width 4" Ft. 5'
  5. Cabin Height 4' Ft. 1"
  6. Cabin Length 12' Ft. 7"
  7. Payload: 1,600 lb (725 kg) cargo.

The "PIPER AZTEC Airplane" also known as the "Piper PA-23," named Apache and later Aztec, is a four-to-six-seat twin-engine "light aircraft" aimed at the "general aviation" market. It has also seen service with the United States Navy and other countries' military forces in small numbers.


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"The PIPER AZTEC Aircraft" was introduced in 1960, and it looked much like the Apache except for a larger, swept vertical fin.. The "Aztec B," introduced in 1962, established the Aztec profile most pilots are familiar with, adding a sixth seat and a long, blunt nose housing a second baggage compartment.


"Piper Aztec Private Aircraft" was incrementally refined over the years, but it never really changed much in any big way. Aside from the wildly instrument panels found on pre-D models, the systems in one are pretty much like the systems in another.


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The Piper Aztec grew from the Piper Apache design, and the two aircraft share the same model numerical designation of PA-23 established during the original Apache certification. The earliest versions of the Aztec differed only slightly in appearance from the Apache, although early Aztecs featured higher performance obtained from 150-hp engines.


In 1964, these differences became greater with the Aztec C featuring fuel injection, a new configuration, and improved landing gear. The 1966 Aztec C was also the first model to offer turbocharging as an option.


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The Aztec's docile handling characteristics make it an ideal multi-engine trainer. If it seems to handle like a giant Cub, that's because it shares the earlier "Private Airplane" wing cross-section.


The Aztec F is equipped with flap-to-statablize trim interconnect to automatically re-trim to neutral pitch control pressures when the flaps are extended or retracted. Also, improved slow-flight characteristics give a more positive climb/approach control.


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The Aztec probably ranks as one of the most docile of the conventional low-wing light twins. While its maximum and cruise speeds compare favorably with the swiftest competitor, the short, thick wing permits slow and safe air-speeds. CENTRAL JET CHARTER Inc. "Piper Aztec."


This means excellent short-field capabilities for critical situations. Both Aztecs can clear the equivalent of a five-story building in just 1,700 feet from brake release. The normally aspirated Aztec’s 75-percent best power cruise is 206 mph with a range of 1,134 miles and 45-minute reserve.


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"PIPER AZTEC Plane" perhaps more important, it offers many students their introduction to the challenges of multi-engine flight, where, like any good instructor, the Aztec is a gentle and reliable friend.


"Private Aircraft Charter in a Piper Aztec" has never been the fastest light twin, nor the one with the greatest payload, nor the most powerful. At can be chartered for $875 per hour and up.


The Piper Aztec in terms of cabin space, load- hauling ability, fuel economy, range, VMC, short-field performance, durability, and accelerate/stop distance, it matched or beat its rivals handily.


"Piper Aztec Airplane, Charter Flights!"




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"Piper Aztec Airplane, Information!"


There was a time, piston engine aircraft manufacturers actually tried to one-up each other.


When Cessna would come out with a new model, the other two members of GA's Big Three would develop a model that would carry more, go faster, go farther or whatever.


Case in point: when Cessna upgraded its 310, Piper countered by adding a fifth seat and bigger engines to its Apache, thus creating the PA-23-250 Aztec.


The first really big change came about in 1962, when Piper introduced the Aztec B. With its longer nose and bigger cabin—now with room for a sixth seat—the B model ushered in the big, brawny, beefy Aztec look that everyone is familiar with today.


Two years later, Piper again enhanced the model's appearance and performance and brought out the Aztec C.


Produced between 1964 and 1968 and featuring streamlined engine nacelles, it was by far the most popular of the Aztecs.


Standard equipment on Aztec C airplanes included fiberglass gear doors, fuel injection, dual alternators and more.


The Aztec D offered pilots a standardized instrument panel and changes to the controls in 1969. Factory-option turbos gave the aircraft a top speed of 250 mph at 24,000 feet. Turbos were first introduced by the factory in 1965.


In 1970, the company introduced the Aztec E model with its stretched, more pointed nose. While the new nose looked cool, reports are that the cosmetic refinement actually came with a 100-pound reduction in the useful load.


The F model, which would turn out to be the last of the Aztec lineage, was produced from 1975 through 1981. In total almost 5,000 Aztecs were built over its 21-year production run.


While the Aztec, like its competition, was continually "improved" over the years, it never really changed much.


Then as now, it's an honest airplane that gives you the ability to pretty much fill the seats, fill the tanks and take off.


And those very attributes are why Mark Matheson has made the Piper Aztec his airplane of choice for business and personal flying.


A steel tubular airframe that's incredibly strong and resistant to the corrosion issues plaguing other aircraft of that era.It also comes with six-place factory oxygen and has a big panel that offers enough room for advanced avionics.


It's a true six-passenger aircraft that still allows for plenty of fuel, or it can carry four passengers with baggage and full fuel.


Single-engine performance is exceptional. It'll climb at full gross weight—and the single-engine service ceiling is above the minimum en route altitude for mountain flying.


There's plenty of speed: an Aztec flies at 200-plus ktas if you want to burn fuel, but pull the throttles back to 170 and it will burn 32 gph total.


The plane has de-icing boots on its leading edges, de-icing for the props and a heated windshield.


Today, more than 30 years on, it continues to provide comfortable personal transportation and to labor honestly in the vineyards of commercial Aviation.


"Private Charter Airplane, The Piper Aztec!"






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"PIPER AZTEC, Aircraft Charter!"


The Apache was Piper's first production twin-engined, four-place executive airplane. As such it was to become the forerunner of a long line of Piper executive and charter aircraft that extends to this day.


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With this airplane, Piper left behind the tube-and-fabric Cub for the modern all-metal airplane. This particular Apache performed commuter and charter service around the eastern United States.


When Piper purchased the assets of the Stinson Division of Consolidated Vultee Aircraft Corporation in 1948, one of the proposed designs was the Twin Stinson that was to be a modification of the popular Stinson 108 Voyager/Station-Wagon.


It was powered by two 125 hp Lycoming O-290D engines. Flight tests in 1952 indicated that the airplane was under-powered and had some control response and vibration problems.


Correction of these difficulties resulted in the complete redesign of the airplane, including all-metal construction, a single vertical fin, retractable landing gear, and 150 hp Lycoming 0-320-A engines with constant speed propellers.


Completed in July 1953, it was renamed the PA-23 Apache and was the first of the Piper "Indians," when Piper began naming its various aircraft after Indian tribes


The first production PA-23-4 Apache was delivered early in 1954. Initially the airplane was to have been sold for $25,000 but the actual price at the time of first production was $32,500.


This was still the least expensive twin of that class. Much to the surprise of many sceptics, sales began to climb and Piper production capacity had difficulty keeping up with the orders.


Piper upgraded the Apache in 1960 with 250 hp Lycoming engines, new flight instrumentation, a swept vertical fin that increased performance, and a new name, the Aztec.


Over 4,800 Aztecs were built. The Apache and Aztec price and size allowed smaller companies and executives to own or operate business aircraft.


The Piper Aztec grew from the Piper Apache design, and the two aircraft share the same model numerical designation of PA-23 established during the original Apache certification.


The earliest versions of the Aztec differed only slightly in appearance from the Apache, although early Aztecs featured higher performance obtained from 150-hp engines.


In 1964, these differences became greater with the Aztec C featuring fuel injection, a new configuration, and improved landing gear. The 1966 Aztec C was also the first model to offer turbocharging as an option.


The Aztec F is equipped with flap-to-stabilator trim interconnect to automatically retrim to neutral pitch control pressures when the flaps are extended or retracted.


Also, improved slow-flight characteristics give a more positive climb/approach control. The Aztec probably ranks as one of the most docile of the conventional low-wing light twins.


While its maximum and cruise speeds compare favorably with the swiftest competitor, the short, thick wing permits slow and safe air speeds.


This means excellent short-field capabilities for critical situations. Both Aztecs can clear the equivalent of a five-story building in just 1,700 feet from brake release.


The normally aspirated Aztec’s 75-percent bestpower cruise is 206 mph with a range of 1,134 miles and 45-minute reserve. Optional tanks stretch that range to 1,519 miles.


The Turbo model has a cruise speed of 242 mph at 22,000 feet, 961 miles with standard fuel, or 1,318 miles with optional fuel.


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